martes, septiembre 30, 2014

¿Por qué no cambiar el referéndum catalán a uno in(ter)dependentista?

Actualización: Neil Irwin elaboró un análisis noticioso excelente, que se distribuyó en el International Weekly de The New York Times. En el Listín Diario se tituló Crisis de fe en la élite global. En prensa Libre Hay crisis de fe en la élite. Desde el punto de vista síntetico, esa crisis es tan solo un síntoma de un problema mayor; el problema real es la decadencia de la democrácia representativa, que nos dio muchos frutos en el tiempo de los países independientes, pero que ya no tiene sentido en un mundo de países interdependientes.
“No podemos resolver nuestros problemas con el mismo sentido común que usamos cuando los creamos.” - mi adaptación a cita de Albert Einstein


Al igual que otras partes del mundo, he descubierto que los ciudadanos catalanes desean la independencia principalmente por los perjuicios que reciben de la democracia representativa. Sin embargo, en un mundo altamente in(ter)dependiente ese deseo de independencia carece del sentido común emergente que es el que conviene. El problema subyacente de la democracia representativa que viene vulnerando a los catalanes, como también perjudica en esos otros países, desaparece si se cambia de un sentido común viejo de los tiempos de la independencia a uno nuevo de los tiempos de la in(ter)dependencia..

Dicho deseo de los catalanes se basa en un sentido común de países independientes que se ha vuelto obsoleto. Igualmente obsoleta por supuesto es la decisión del Tribunal Constitucional que también se basa en ese mismo sentido común que necesita ser superado con un cambio constitucional, por ejemplo, conforme a la nota Propuesta al G20 para impulsar la democracia directa.

Dado que un nuevo referéndum sería entonces integracionista, en vez de separatista, el argumento central de dicho Tribunal se cae. Igualmente, dicha propuesta serviría de ejemplo a la transformación (no reforma) constitucional que la Unión Europea está necesitando con suma urgencia y eventualmente de otros países y regiones, hasta reorganizar el mundo, como se sugirió al G20. 

domingo, septiembre 28, 2014

Avoiding delays on capitalism's transformation

"... a majority of respondents strongly agreed that the primary purpose of the corporation is to serve customers’ interests as ultimately the best means to add value for shareholders." -- Aspen Institute
As will be seen below, believe it or not, the question “Can human beings prefer EcoIsOurs capitalism to other alternatives?” is well above public or private politics. It is a question of the system architecting at the highest level of the institutions of government and markets in a world of interdependent countries that’s urgently needed. As can be also seen, this is neither necessarily pro-business nor pro-government; it is essentially pro-people.

Pro-people is well in agreement with the above quote of the Aspen Institute, as can be seen in the much broader context of the article Has Capitalism Reached A Turning Point?, by Steve Denning, a contributor to Forbes. I say yes! Capitalism has reached a turning point. However, Mr. Denning is not so sure when in his approach:
The question is whether the Drucker Forum in November will be able to reach agreement on the way forward and generate an united front for reform, or whether it will, as at the Colloquy of Marburg in 1529, splinter into different factions, as thought leaders emphasize their own particular slant on the issues, with the obvious common ground among them being lost in the din of heated debate on tiny doctrinal issues.
According to Mr. Denning, "many of the world’s thought leaders will converge on Vienna Austria on November 13-14, 2014 to discuss this very question at the Global Peter Drucker Forum 2014. The speakers include Clayton Christensen, Gary Hamel and Roger Martin, among many others." In order to avoid debate on transformation (not reform, see below) on that Forum, like it happened to Martin Luther, I suggest that after 5 centuries we know a lot better. Instead of starting with a debate, which will only benefit the status quo while delaying the process, I suggest starting with a generative dialogue under a system architecting approach, which as you will see is already well advanced and not necessarily limited to that Forum.

The argument behind the system architecting considerations (more at the end on what can make EcoIsOurs a predetermine element of several scenarios) is that people that have been induced to prefer to be on the right or on the left, need to discover if what they need is less governments elites, whether democratically elected or not. Instead, in agreement with earlier findings, what it is proposed here is a more direct democracy, under great markets to be available under EcoIsOurs humanistic capitalism.

The main reason it is best for everyone is because it will try to operate on a series of mutually reinforcing virtuous circles, where all stakeholders will have the opportunity to win. That is in contrast to EcoNoMic capitalism, communism, and socialism, where one part of the population benefit from virtuous circles, while the other generally faces services under vicious circles. Even in cases where general elections are very close in the number of votes, the winning majority rules. It’s easy to see how that has become wrong as the world changed.

A new learning of the emergent future is well in agreement with the post Synthesis of a proposed global partnership on climate and development. It comes in part from the interpretation of a broader and timely story that Neil Irwin told us with his article In Scotland and Beyond, a Crisis of Faith in the Global Elite, published on September 20, 2014, in the New York Times.

Mr. Irwin wrote in a earlier and shorter version of September 18, 2014, that “when you get past the details of the Scottish independence referendum Thursday, there is a broader story underway, one that is also playing out in other advanced nations.” After adding how this week "a right-wing anti-immigration party in Sweden claimed its largest-ever share of parliamentary votes" and "new census data released this week showed that middle-income American families made 8 percent less last year, adjusted for inflation, than they did in 2007,” he says that “what these stories have in common is this: They lay bare a crisis of faith in the global elite.” Then he goes on to add other events of the past to support the crisis.

Identifying where the crisis is in the worst shape, Mr. Irvin warns us that “… it is in Continental Europe that the consequences of bungling by mainstream elites are perhaps the most damaging, and the most dangerous.” Such a warning reinforces the identification that shows up in the suggestion of the note Why the Eurozone leaders must change their common sense first. That post was updated yesterday, for example, to clarify the big difference between the meaning of reform and transformation. In similarity to the Protestant Reformation (a transformation in today's sense) of the Catholic Church, what the Eurozone needs is transformation of the whole, not the reform of some parts.

Under the emerging common sense that drives EcoIsOurs humanistic capitalism, Mr. Irvin’s conclusion is not limited to advanced nations. It is that mess (term taken from September 18) that has also affected most other countries in the world. The problem is that with both democratic and non democratic governments, people are now able to express their discontent, as we have moved from the Fordism (after Henry Ford) of the 4th technological revolution of the industrial civilization to the Jobsism (after Steve Jobs) of the 1st technological revolution of the systemic civilization. This reflection is an update to the historical context of the above mentioned synthesis as described next.

As can be seen, Irwin identifies the discontents on both the left and the right, by saying: “… there are always people who have disagreements with the direction of policy in their nation; the whole point of a state is to have an apparatus that channels disparate preferences into one sound set of policy choices.” That kind of set of policies operated very well for business to business’ channels in the Fordism world.

As the Jobsism (not to be confused with early attempts to describe it as Post-Fordism) world is replacing the Fordism one, operating very well on direct business to customers’ channels, the restrictions to only one set of sound policy choices are no longer accepted by people that experience social networks on a day to day basis. This reminds me of the quote attributed to Justice Potter Stewart as he was stepping down from the Supreme Court in the US: “I may not be able to define obscenity, but I know it when I see it.”

In fact, this learning from the emergent future fits very well with the post Would middle-class 'indignados' prefer direct democracy?, which people are not expecting, but might love. Although those indignados were unable to define what the political elites were doing to them, they knew what they were seeing, even before Mr. Invin was able to define it as having “in common a sense that the established order isn't serving them” and the EcoIsOurs humanistic capitalism emerged.

The lesson learned is that the failure of representative democratic elections (or imposed otherwise) is now deep into the awareness of many people as it can now be replaced by a direct market democracy to stop the mess of thing we are in, where governments have invaded the market space and vice versa. That’s what the transformation of capitalism, communism and socialism into the EcoIsOurs humanistic capitalism should be all about.

It is precisely the industrial civilization supply side average of disparate preferences into only one sound choice of governments that have generated very serious perverse problems, which were identified as far back in 1972, by two professors. To learn more about it, please take a look, for example, at the paper A complete and fully functional electricity restructuring proposal.

For completeness, please take a look at why system architecting is able help us in a way that’s described in the blog post Límites que van por encima de la política (Limits that go above politics). Such help allows, for example, a shift from an independent system architecture to an interdependent one, that can provide and dissolve (not need to solve) the Yes No problem of independence referedums, which can be found in section 2, The Architecture of Civilization, in Alvin Tofflers’ book The Third Wave, which says:
We see here in outline, therefore, the common structures of all Second Wave nations—regardless of their cultural or climatic differences, regardless of their ethnic and religious heritage, regardless of whether they call themselves capitalist or communist. 
These parallel structures, as basic in the Soviet Union and Hungary as in West Germany, France, or Canada, set the limits within which political, social, and cultural differences were expressed. They emerged everywhere only after bitter political, cultural, and economic battles between those who attempted to preserve the older First Wave structures and those who recognized that only a new civilization could solve the painful problems of the old.


jueves, septiembre 25, 2014

Would middle-class 'indignados' prefer direct democracy?

"Everything that is done in the world is done by hope." -- Martin Luther

Following Steve Jobs's quote, in which he said that "you can only connect the points backward," I am now able to connect backwards key important points for the Middle Class 'Indignados' (defined below) liquid movement cause. Such a movement might now have a Protestant Reformation solid cause, like the one Martin Luther lead against the Catholic Church. 

First let's consider the article Taxed energy: thought Occupiers aren’t expecting, but will love, where I responded to the story "The 15-M is emotional, lacks thought," published in El Pais, October 17, 2011, [by] Zigmunt Bauman, Polish philosopher and sociologist known for his concept of liquid modernity," to provide the missing thought required to make their cause solid on the electric power industry.

That though was intended to be generalized the point of the article "On the basic services expected by middle-class 'indignados','' which was written July 16, 2013 and only made available to a wider audience today, where it can be seen below as a point that can also be connected backwards. As can be seen, while Francis Fukuyama argued "for a conventional political approach" with representative democracy, a market approach has recently emerged for direct democracy in order to connect backwards.

Such an approach, emerges after developing the post Synthesis of a proposed global partnership on climate and development, which can be contrasted through of government solution shown in the Wall Street Journal news Middle Class Brazil Lifts Voice, as an example of the obsolete representative democracy reality. I am sharing the new approach to a wider audience of Middle Class 'Indignados' to see if they can connect the points backwards to enable the direct democracy being proposed. Please help get this solid proposal across.

On the basic services expected by middle-class 'indignados'''

© 2013. 2014. José Antonio Vanderhorst Silverio, Ph.D.
Systemic Consultant
IEEE Life Senior Member
Advanced text shared for individual use and feedback only [on 2013].
Please comment!

In what follows it is shown that Jim Collins’ bestseller “Good to Great: Why some companies make the leap… and others don’t” is the revolutionary management book that has been expected to be able to end the tyranny of the prevailing style of management envisioned by the late well-known management guru W. Edwards Deming. Listening carefully to Jim Collins we may jump to the conclusion that the non-revolutionary title Good to Great needs to be understood as the revolutionary title Mediocre to Great.

In fact the idea of mediocrity shows up in the back cover jacket of Good to Great. It is in the praise given by the late management guru Peter Drucker, which says: “This carefully researched and well written book disproves most of the current management hype – from the cult of the superhuman CEO to the cult of IT to the acquisitions and merger mania. It will not enable mediocrity to become competence. But it should enable competence to become excellence.” For those who still don’t know Drucker, according to Wikipedia he was “one of the best-known and most widely influential thinkers and writers on the subject of management theory and practice.”

In addition, on the back cover jacket of the 2011 HarperCollins book Great by Choice, by Collins and Morten T. Hansen, most of the praise by the business press is for Collins, as a great leader himself. Fortune: “… the most influential management thinker alive;” Wall Street Journal “With both Good to Great and Built to Last, Mr. Collins delivers two seductive messages: that great management is attainable by mere mortals and that its practitioners can build great institutions. It’s just what us mortals want to hear;” The Economist “… excels at the American method of empirical business research;” New York Times: “For this guru, no question is too big.”

Based on the empirical research of Collins books, I assert that the “… the failure of governments to meet the rising expectations of the newly prosperous and educated" is a management problem as a result of mediocre basic services. That quote is taken from the last part of the subtitle of the Wall Street Journal article The Middle-Class Revolution by Francis Fukuyama, which starts with "All over the world, argues Francis Fukuyama, today's political turmoil has a common theme: the failure of governments…”

In his article, Fukuyama says that “The theme that connects recent events in Turkey and Brazil to each other, as well as to the 2011 Arab Spring and continuing protests in China, is the rise of a new global middle class. Everywhere it has emerged, a modern middle class causes political ferment, but only rarely has it been able, on its own, to bring about lasting political change. Nothing we have seen lately in the streets of Istanbul or Rio de Janeiro suggests that these cases will be an exception.”

It is asserted that such middle-class is all over the world and not just where protests have emerged.  That’s why in the title of this article middle-class indignados (MCIs) is generalized to refer to all protestors. In effect they include the Occupy Wall Street and particularly the Spanish indignados movements that were hinted by Fukuyama in the last paragraph of his article with “No politician in the U.S. or Europe should look down complacently on the events unfolding in the streets of Istanbul and São Paulo. It would be a grave mistake to think, ‘It can't happen here.’"

In response to the exception mentioned above, Fukuyama argues for a conventional political approach. He says that “Unless they can form a coalition with other parts of society, their movements seldom produce enduring political change.” He later adds that MCIs “…failed to follow up by organizing political parties that were capable of contesting nationwide elections.”

Using a different political approach, it is argued here that instead of a coalition, now that Mediocre to Great management is available, MCIs all over the world should unite to press for the end of the tyranny of the prevailing style of management, as described in W. Edwards Deming, book “The New Economics For Industry, Government, Education,” published in 1993 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Advanced Engineering Study.

In fact to start to bring about lasting change in government, industry, education, heath, global MCIs must unite in a civil rights like basic services movement to protest for the implementation of a Good to Great culture of discipline which shifts basis services away from the “Doom Loop” and into “Flywheel Effects.” The pressure to governments will require reforms that enable markets in which the private sector will compete to provide great basic services.

It is now understood that the rising expectations of the MCIs can only be met by great companies through markets, not by more government regulation. MCIs already know that we live in a world where, for example, Steve Jobs showed how their rising expectations could be met for basic services they were not expecting but will love.

Last but not least, it is important to stress that citing “cross-national studies,” Fukuyama wrote that MCIs “… want not just security for their families but choices and opportunities for themselves. Those who have completed high school or have some years of university education are far more likely to be aware of events in other parts of the world and to be connected to people of a similar social class abroad through technology.”



Synthesis of a proposed global partnership on climate and development

This is a translation of the post Síntesis propuesta alianza mundial entre el clima y el desarrollo (links are only in the Spanish version).

In response to the news "Latin America calls for a global partnership on climate and development," this adapts and synthesizes the blog post "Proposal to G20 to boost direct democracy" and all its background.

A global alliance on climate and development is not feasible with the obsolete common sense under which heads of state of supposedly independent countries have been meeting, which would be ruled by the money that drives the EcoNoMy of wild capitalism (which has become increasingly less civilized). For that alliance to become feasible it is necessary to change to an emerging common sense, under with heads of state of recognize that their countries are interdependent, which would be governed by the wisdom that drives EcoIsOurs humanist capitalism.

Instead of more government and less market, which is what is being done, induced by the widespread obsolete common sense, what is required is less government and more market with private sector actors, using the emerging common sense to enable said alliance. Such government would be led by great statesmen (which already can be developed). Markets incentives and disincentives must ensure positive systemic leverage, which is the only way that all stakeholders will have the opportunity to win every day by participating in elections under the direct democracy of the market that people are not expecting but will love. Thus the great statesmen will ensure with the alliance the extinction of vampires in the public and private sectors, disarming the large-scale systemic corruption that has been seriously distorting markets.


miércoles, septiembre 24, 2014

Síntesis propuesta alianza mundial entre el clima y el desarrollo

En respuesta a la noticia Latinoaméricareclama una alianza mundial entre el clima y el desarrollo, se adapta y sintetiza la nota Propuesta al G20 para impulsar la democracia directa y todo su trasfondo.

Una alianza mundial entre el clima y el desarrollo no es factible con el sentido común obsoleto con que vienen reuniéndose los jefes de Estado de países supuestamente independientes, la cual vendría gobernada por el dinero que impulsa la EcoNoMía del capitalismo salvaje (que se ha vuelto cada vez menos civilizado). Para que sea factible dicha alianza, es necesario cambiar a un sentido común emergente, con jefes de Estados de países que reconozcan que son interdependientes, la cual vendría gobernada por la sabiduría que impulse la EcoSiNuestra del capitalismo humanista.

En vez de más Estado y menos mercado, que es lo que se ha venido haciendo, inducidos por dicho sentido común obsoleto ampliamente difundido, lo que se requiere es menos Estado y más mercado con agentes del sector privado, empleando dicho sentido común emergente para llegar a dicha alianza. Dicho Estado estaría dirigido por estadistas sobresalientes (que ya se pueden desarrollar). Los incentivos y desincentivos de los mercados deben  asegurar apalancamientos sistémicos positivos, que es la única forma en que todos los interesados tendrán la oportunidad de ganar, al participar día a día en elecciones bajo la democracia directa del mercado que la gente no está esperando pero les encantará. Es así como los estadistas sobresalientes podrán garantizar la extinción de los vampiros de los sectores público y privado con dicha alianza, desarmando la corrupción sistémica de grandes proporciones que ha venido distorsionando seriamente los mercados.

martes, septiembre 23, 2014

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